Faith Without Works Is Dead

8 posts / 0 new
Last post
atrueone
atrueone's picture
Faith Without Works Is Dead

I am happy to write thoughts on this website.  Recently, I apologized for my extended time off line.  In that post I took a few moments to share with those who don't know me how I have been an advocate for extended families for many years. 

I received a comment from another member who pointed out that there are a lot of folks that will tell you they are advocates, but most are silent and lack action.  This young woman hit the nail on the head.  It is easy to use the term advocate on a website that is full of other people who agree with you, but is far more difficult to do so in a world where you mighrt lose everything for your beliefs.  In the book of James, he points out that faith without works is dead.  In the Gospel of John, Jesus makes one statement several times in various ways. To paraphrase If you love me you will obey my commandments, if you do not obey my commandments my love is not in you.  No matter where you look in the New testament, believers are urged to action.

The great news is that action leads to change.  The Apostles went out and spread the message and changed the world.  The bad news is that until change comes you will face adversity.  The question that comes to mind is what are you willing to lose to change the world?

The term Christian means to be a follower, disciple or mimicker of Christ.  Are you willing to be any of those things?  If so it requires action.

atrueone
atrueone's picture
True

Comment: 

The undrerstanding of the words of Jesus is altered not only by the century in which they are being read but also by the views of the ones doing the reading.  Here is a simple but profound view of the Gospels. Jesus was a first century Jew, speaking to first century Jews, about first century Jews.  To really understand the words of Jesus reuires understanding the traditions and cultural realities of his time.

T. D. Bennett

atrueone
atrueone's picture
What he said

Comment: 

You might look at Matthew chapters 5 6 and 7 or Luke 6 for starters.

T. D. Bennett

atrueone
atrueone's picture
serena your on fire (lol)

Comment: 

As a Messianic Jew I know one thing that is a fact, "The Word is the same yesterday today and forever."  Many seem to think that it changes based upon in what time period you live in.  Yet if this is true then the Word would not and can not change. 

As I have pointed out in other writings, the term Christian means to be a follower, disciple, or mimicker of Christ.  The Gospel of Luke tells us it was Jesus tradition to go to the temple on the Sabbath.  As a Jew that would be sunset Friday to sunset Saturday.  If it is mt greatest desire to follow him then for me sunset Friday to sunset Saturday is the Sabbath.If I declare myself as his disciplie then those things he commanded don't alter. Great post!

T. D. Bennett

Apostle
Amen Serena

Comment: 

Man always tries to impose the will of man on others then justify it by trying to make it holy.  The biggest problem I see is most people have a God made in the image of a man.  They make God act think and reward and punish the way their carnal mind works. 

"I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ."
Gandhi

atrueone
atrueone's picture
I appreciate you so very much

Comment: 

I can not speak for all Messianics but I choose to use the term because of the number of issues that have arrisen in the term Christian. Additionally I am a Jew biologically.  It does not mean I believe I have a leg up on anyone else.  But the term Messianic Jew is who I am.  I use the term Jesus rather than Yeshua in forums like this one so that people do not get tied up in verbage. 

The idea of when Jesus went to the temple is founded in the reality that Jesus (Yeshua) was a Jew.  We know from the Gospels that he celebrated the traditional holidays. We know that those who buried him had to hurry to get him in the tomb because the Sabbath was drawing near.  It doesn't make it better or worse than any other tradition, but these are documented scriptural facts.  I mean what is known as the Lord's Supper, was celebrated on the first day of Passover.

So I hope this helps. 

T. D. Bennett

atrueone
atrueone's picture
the idea of weekly Sabbath

Comment: 

The idea of a weekly Sabbath begins in Genesis with the creation story.  The day after the creation was completed it says on the seventh day God rested.  Even in this story we see that the belief system is based on the moon. "The evening and the morning were the first day."

Moving on The Torah (or books of the law) give specific statements concerning the Sabbath.  Where this could be virewed as a "man made system," it should be noted that it is understtod from these books that these laws came from God.  The best example from these books is the story or Moses and the ten commandments.

Moving to the New Testament, in Maathew 5 Jesus makes it clear that not one comma or period of the law will be negated till all things are fulfilled.  So if we can agree on the value of the words spken by Jesus then it becomes clear concerning the Sabbath.

T. D. Bennett

atrueone
atrueone's picture
The calender

Comment: 

On this point I do agree.  The use of the Julian calender tends to throw everything into an uphevel.  By using the Hebrew calender it tends to make more sense.

T. D. Bennett